We too frequently become adept at pointing out our flaws and identifying failures. We need to become equally adept at citing our achievements. We have to be willing to say to ourselves, I’m on the right road. I’m doing OK. I’m succeeding.

How do we change our mindset from fault-finding and uninspiring to one that’s positive and motivating? Here are three ways to stay motivated:

1. Chart your progress.

Identify things you are doing now that you weren’t doing one month ago… six months ago… a year ago. What habits have changed?

Doing well once or twice is relatively easy. Continuously moving ahead is tough, in part, because we so easily revert to old habits and former lifestyles. So give yourself regular feedback to monitor your performance and reinforce yourself positively. Don’t wait for an award ceremony, promotion, friend or mentor to show appreciation for your work. Take pride in your own efforts on a daily basis.

2. Keep the end result in sight.

Always see the big picture of the ultimate goal you’re working for and the benefits that come with it.

During World War II, parachutes were being constructed by the thousands. From the workers point of view, the job was tedious and repetitive. It involved crouching over a sewing machine eight to 10 hours a day, stitching endless lengths of colorless fabric. The result was a seamless heap of cloth. But every morning the workers were reminded that each stitch was part of a life-saving operation. As they sewed, they were asked to think that this might be the parachute worn by their husband, brother or son. Although the work was hard and the hours long, the women and men on the assembly line understood their contribution to the larger picture.

The same should be true with your work. Each thing you do benefits someone, something—the lives and well-being of adults and children throughout the world, not just generally, but specifically. These are the visions that drive us through tedious details to the top.

3. Set up a dynamic daily routine.

Getting into a positive routine or groove, instead of a negative rut, will help you become more effective. Why is the subway the most energy efficient means of transportation? Because it runs on a track.

Think of the order in your day, instead of the routine. Order is not sameness, neatness or everything exactly in its place. Order is not taking on more than you can manage, without still being able to do what you really choose. Order is the opposite of complication; it’s simplification. Order is not wasting a lot of time trying to find things. Order is avoiding a lot of recriminations because you didn’t do something you promised. Order is setting an effective agenda with others so neither of you is disappointed. Order is doing in a day what you set out to do. Order frees you up. Get into the swing of a healthy, daily routine and discover how much more control you’ll gain in your life.

Source... www.success.com

You know those relationships that drain your energy? The ones that impact your ability to really thrive at home, at work, in life? There are consequences of enduring them and failing to face up to reality that something’s just not right.
And while there’s no point pretending a relationship has a future if it doesn’t, it’s just as important to recognize when relationships are right, when they’re worth investing in.
So whether it’s with your children, your spouse, your parents, your friends or your co-workers, here are seven signs of a good, healthy relationship:

1. Trust.

Great relationships are built on a foundation of trust—something that takes time to build and is hard to regain once it’s lost. Without trust, relationships of every kind will fail. You know you trust each other when you feel safe, comfortable, open, close. It’s reflected in your willingness to listen to the tough stuff—and learn from it.

2. Openness.

You express yourselves openly and honestly. No topic is off limits. Both parties feel heard. You engage in honest and respectful conversations that allow you to understand one another and build a genuine connection. When you have problems and concerns, you share them directly and not with other people. You never complain or criticize behind each other’s backs.

3. Respect.

Both parties recognize that neither of you is perfect. You accept each other the way you are. Too often we focus on what we expect or hope people will be, and while it’s important to recognize how people can grow or learn, holding onto who you expect someone to become will inevitably lead to disappointment and frustration.

4. Teamwork.

To make the relationships in your life work, you and the other person both have to do your part—because it takes two to tango. You make decisions together and listen to each other’s concerns and preferences. You bring your ideas and opinions together and remain open minded to one another’s point of view. You work with mutual trust and respect to achieve what you each need. 

5. Joy.

Healthy relationships are energized by laughter, by fun. While you can’t expect anyone to be happy every minute of every day, good relationships uplift our spirits and make us feel loved and accepted.  Most people are capable of frustrating or annoying us at times, but what matters is the ability to move past petty disagreements and look for reasons to enjoy each other’s company. 

6. Kindness.

You treat each other with care, consideration and compassion. You are friendly and speak with warmth and consideration. You are generous toward each other. When we choose to invest in the needs of others, the impact is significant. 

7. Forgiveness.

Holding on to baggage weighs heavily on any relationship. Resentment, disappointment and frustration, when left unresolved, erode trust and drain our spirit. You know you have a great relationship when you are able to express how you feel and let it go. You are able to forgive shortcoming and failings. You support one another. You learn from the experiences you face, and you move on. 
- source: http://www.success.com/article/7-things-all-great-relationships-have-in-common