Successful people always inspire others to keep moving and never to give up. But there is a lot to learn from them. Here is a list of 5 things that define a successful man:

1. Not So Emotional: Successful people are less melodramatic. They value their energy and time. Being emotional can cost them both.

2. Have A Practical Approach To life: They are practical when it comes to setting goals and strategies.

3. Good Listeners: They listen more and speak less. They try to intake as much of information as they can.

4. Panctual: They value time and are punctual. They are always on time whether they have to reach at a wedding or at some conference.

5. Health Conscious: Falling ill can cost alot to someone preparing to be at the top. Therefore, a successful person will always be conscious of one's health.

How to Win Friends and Influence People

  1. Get you out of a mental rut, give you new thoughts, new visions, new ambitions.
  2. Enable you to make friends quickly and easily.
  3. Increase your popularity.
  4. Help you to win people to your way of thinking.
  5. Increase your influence, your prestige, your ability to get things done.


Think and Grow Rich

Think and Grow Rich was written in 1937 by Napoleon Hill, promoted as a personal development and self-improvement book. Hill writes that he was inspired by a suggestion from business magnate and later-philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.
The 13 "steps" listed in the book are:
  • 1. Desire
  • 2. Faith
  • 3. Autosuggestion
  • 4. Specialized Knowledge
  • 5. Imagination
  • 6. Organized Planning
  • 7. Decision
  • 8. Persistence
  • 9. Power of the Master Mind
  • 10. The Mystery of Sex Transmutation
  • 11. The Subconscious Mind
  • 12. The Brain
  • 13. The Sixth Sense


 

Rich Dad Poor Dad

The book is largely based on Kiyosaki's childhood upbringing and education in Hawaii. It highlights the different attitudes to money, work, and life of two men (i.e. his titular "rich dad" and "poor dad"), and how they in turn influenced key decisions in Kiyosaki's life.
Among some of the book's topics are:
  • Robert Kiyosaki's personal story, upbringing, and his business and investment ventures throughout his early adult life and into the late 1990s.
  • Differentiation between assets and liabilities
  • What the rich teach their kids about money that the poor and middle class do not
  • The idea that your primary residence is not an asset, but a liability
  • The value of financial intelligence and financial literacy
  • How stronger business and financial skills, aptitude, and experience play a role in one's financial success
  • The vitality of entrepreneurial and investment skills are both necessary and useful traits to prosper in a capitalistic society
  • The importance of investing and entrepreneurship in taking control of one's financial future

 

So your name is out there now. As I said before, established brand names can still thrive even when having a negative reputation. Denny’s had a great 2013. Now take a look at what their customers think of them.

Getting links on authority sites is a great way to have some authority rub off on you. Not only is the link viewed as a vote of confidence by search engines, more importantly, it’s viewed as a vote of confidence by users.
According to Conductor, search engines direct about 47% of online traffic. Of all the sources, search engines represent a plurality of directed traffic. But that means the majority of traffic is independent of search engine rankings. According to the same Conductor study, non-social referral visits account for 15% of the internet’s traffic. Even using Conductor’s sample size of 310 million hits, that’s 4.7 million referral clicks.

This is my way of saying that links don’t only lead to search engine traffic. A well-placed link on an authority site can direct an abundance of referral traffic.
Right now in the world of SEO, it’s more important than ever to be cognizant of anchor text diversity. Google is not fond of sites that use the same keyword-rich anchor text over and over.

So along with keyword and white noise anchors, branded anchors should absolutely be part of your link profile.

This is a good thing. Being “forced” to use your brand name as an anchor is a way of simply getting your name out there. Even if a user doesn’t click the first time seeing your name, the more that user sees your name, the more that user is going to be compelled to click. And once they click, they are led to the biggest branding opportunity you have: your site.

There’s no better representation of your brand than your website, and link building is a valuable way to get people to look at your brand in all of its glory.

So you have great content. Now what? As awesome as, say, your info graphic might be, people aren’t going to find it without being pointed towards it.

You might be saying, “What about social media? Wouldn’t it be easier to share it on our social media channels?”

I’m never going to advocate being absent on social media. Even if social signals are not part of Google’s algorithm, they have indirect effects on rankings.

Even though social media is an effective method of promotion, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be building links as well in your promotional efforts.
If you’re building links without building relationships, you’re doing it wrong.

I can’t emphasize enough how much easier link building is when you have relationships within your niche to rely upon.


Let’s say your primary online strategy to gain visibility is through the usage of social media. Building a legitimate following on social media is one of the most trying tasks of going that route. When I say legitimate, I mean gaining followers without bios like this:

Did you ever think that you can gain followers outside of the parameters of social media? It happens to me frequently. I attract a few followers every time I get a link, and the majority of the time the followers are people I’ve never talked to in the realms of social media channels.

Relationship building leads to visibility, no matter where you want to be seen.

Our link building campaigns have often created new relationships for clients, relationships which have provided benefits outside of SEO. Think partnership or advertising opportunities. Without our link building services, those relationships would not exist.
It's pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain about--few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door.

Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter: people don't leave jobs; they leave managers.

The sad thing is that this can easily be avoided. All that's required is a new perspective and some extra effort on the manager's part.

First, we need to understand the nine worst things that managers do that send good people packing.

1. They Overwork People


Nothing burns good employees out quite like overworking them. It's so tempting to work your best people hard that managers frequently fall into this trap. Overworking good employees is perplexing; it makes them feel as if they're being punished for great performance. Overworking employees is also counterproductive. New research from Stanford shows that productivity per hour declines sharply when the workweek exceeds 50 hours, and productivity drops off so much after 55 hours that you don't get anything out of working more.

If you must increase how much work your talented employees are doing, you'd better increase their status as well. Talented employees will take on a bigger workload, but they won't stay if their job suffocates them in the process. Raises, promotions, and title-changes are all acceptable ways to increase workload. If you simply increase workload because people are talented, without changing a thing, they will seek another job that gives them what they deserve.

2. They Don't Recognize Contributions and Reward Good Work


It's easy to underestimate the power of a pat on the back, especially with top performers who are intrinsically motivated. Everyone likes kudos, none more so than those who work hard and give their all. Managers need to communicate with their people to find out what makes them feel good (for some, it's a raise; for others, it's public recognition) and then to reward them for a job well done. With top performers, this will happen often if you're doing it right.

3. They Don't Care about Their Employees


More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee's success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts. Bosses who fail to really care will always have high turnover rates. It's impossible to work for someone eight-plus hours a day when they aren't personally involved and don't care about anything other than your production yield.


4. They Don't Honor Their Commitments


Making promises to people places you on the fine line that lies between making them very happy and watching them walk out the door. When you uphold a commitment, you grow in the eyes of your employees because you prove yourself to be trustworthy and honorable (two very important qualities in a boss). But when you disregard your commitment, you come across as slimy, uncaring, and disrespectful. After all, if the boss doesn't honor his or her commitments, why should everyone else?

5. They Hire and Promote the Wrong People


Good, hard-working employees want to work with like-minded professionals. When managers don't do the hard work of hiring good people, it's a major demotivator for those stuck working alongside them. Promoting the wrong people is even worse. When you work your tail off only to get passed over for a promotion that's given to someone who glad-handed their way to the top­­­­­­­, it's a massive insult. No wonder it makes good people leave.

6. They Don't Let People Pursue Their Passions


Talented employees are passionate. Providing opportunities for them to pursue their passions improves their productivity and job satisfaction. But many managers want people to work within a little box. These managers fear that productivity will decline if they let people expand their focus and pursue their passions. This fear is unfounded. Studies show that people who are able to pursue their passions at work experience flow, a euphoric state of mind that is five times more productive than the norm.


7. They Fail to Develop People's Skills


When managers are asked about their inattention to employees, they try to excuse themselves, using words such as "trust," "autonomy," and "empowerment." This is complete nonsense. Good managers manage, no matter how talented the employee. They pay attention and are constantly listening and giving feedback.

Management may have a beginning, but it certainly has no end. When you have a talented employee, it's up to you to keep finding areas in which they can improve to expand their skill set. The most talented employees want feedback--more so than the less talented ones--and it's your job to keep it coming. If you don't, your best people will grow bored and complacent.

8. They Fail to Engage Their Creativity


The most talented employees seek to improve everything they touch. If you take away their ability to change and improve things because you're only comfortable with the status quo, this makes them hate their jobs. Caging up this innate desire to create not only limits them, it limits you.

9. They Fail to Challenge People Intellectually


Great bosses challenge their employees to accomplish things that seem inconceivable at first. Instead of setting mundane, incremental goals, they set lofty goals that push people out of their comfort zones. Then, good managers do everything in their power to help them succeed. When talented and intelligent people find themselves doing things that are too easy or boring, they seek other jobs that will challenge their intellects.

Bringing It All Together


If you want your best people to stay, you need to think carefully about how you treat them. While good employees are as tough as nails, their talent gives them an abundance of options. You need to make them want to work for you.

What other ? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

The inspiration for this article came from a piece authored by Mike Myatt.
Image Courtesy: www.currentbiz.io
All those who work or run some business might have come across a time when they were made to feel ignored, small and invaluable. No matter how much one gives in, there are times when the efforts are turned down. In such situations, it is quite natural for someone to feel dislocated, isolated and the feeling of vengeance might overrule the entire judgement of a person. But, vengeance in business provide little consolation and that's why one should't seek revenge.

Here are four main reasons why you should never seek revenge in business:


  1. Revenge can escalate the bad situation or rebound in an unexpected and harmful way. 
  2. Your problem is not others problem so seeking revenge won't get you anything (not even sympathy). But, seeing you as an entrepreneur with a problem will only give gossips to the media. Don't feed their hungry eyes!
  3. If something went wrong, it doesn't mean that you were right. Raising the issue will also put you under suspicion of doing something wrong. So, why to raise someone's brow when you can sit and relax. 
  4. The problem will pass out because life isn't constant. 


I’m about to lay it on thick, Friend.

 
Ideas, ideas, ideas.

Everybody has an idea that they want to get off the ground. Everybody thinks his or hers is the greatest undiscovered secret mankind doesn’t yet know about.

 

I wish I could have made you feel the passion and intensity I had for Rich20 when it was just an idea in my head.

 

I was bubbling and brimming with enthusiasm.

 

In my head, I didn't have a clear idea of what I wanted to do. I just knew that I was meant to do "more" than I was but I didn't know what the next step was supposed to be. It was an uncomfortable feeling — and if I'm being 100% honest, it was a completely naïeve place to be.

 

I thought that crystallizing the idea would make the execution easier. If I just figured out the "what," the "how" would reveal itself.

 

Funny enough, if I'd known how difficult it was going to be at that time, I might have said "Nah. I'll pass."

 

Yes, I've heard MANY “successful” entrepreneurs say this. If they’d have known what they know now about being an entrepreneur, despite their perceived success, they might not have done it because it’s THAT hard.

 

Don't believe me? Come on the journey and find out.

 

It's not about the idea. It never was. Your idea is absolutely, 100% worthless.

 

Please know this.

 

I'm not trying to be mean or dismissive, because at one point not very long ago, I was there too. So I empathize. But you get no sympathy.

 

I did everything some members of my Tribe do with me today. I tried to approach influencers with my idea, thinking that they'd be impressed, and was hurt when I barely got the time of day.

 

Not a glance. Not even so much as a response.

 

I remember watching a video with Marie Forleo where, in response to a reader's question, she simply said: "Here's an idea...GOOGLE IT!"

 

I thought she was rude AF and very unhelpful. “What was wrong with these successful people,” I wondered? Had they just lost touch with the noobs? Didn't they remember what it was like? Were they hoarding secrets?”

 

Ugh!

 

6 years later, that's one of my favorite lines. GOOGLE IT. Ha! How times change.

 

A few years later, Ramit Sethi hired me...and then fired me because, for all intents and purposes, I didn't have the greatest attention to detail. Late on projects. Busy doing my own stuff. Obsessed with my idea for Rich20. Etc. Etc.

 

At the time, I was FURIOUS. Indignant. Resentful.

 

But you know what? I'd do the same exact thing now if I was in his position. That's how important my company is to me. And that's how small the margin for error is sometimes, whether you're making $100K or $100M.

 

Life comes around, doesn't it? Savage.

 

I had audacity. That's for sure.

 

What I didn't realize for years is that the Idea Phase is so close to NOTHING that nobody who has actually done anything cares about your idea.

 

You've probably only progressed about one centimeter on an entire football field at that point.

 

We all want a mentor. We personally connect with a specific influencer through the articles they’ve written, or the podcasts they’ve produced, or the videos they create...that person speaks to us. They get us.

 

We think that influencer will care about us the same way we care about them.

 

But here’s the unfortunate truth...while you think that you're asking something unique and original, people who've achieved some success get variations of the same 5 questions all day, every day, 24/7/365.

 

And it always ends with some permutation of, "How do I get started?"

 

Sigh.

 

That.

 

The "getting started" part is the part that only YOU can figure out. And with all the resources out there, that's the EASY part. Getting started is nothing. There are cheap books and free articles on getting started.

 

Hell, there’s Google! Thanks, Marie.

 

The hard part is the pushing through and the FINISHING. And that's something no info product can teach.

 

But you gotta use your resources to get past the first part. Otherwise, why WOULD anybody give you the time of day.

 

Prove you care enough to try without being spoonfed.

 

Trust me when I say that even the smartest people are fumbling around in the dark. Do you really think Elon Musk knows what he's doing? Sometimes, yes. Most of the time, it's all educated guessing and a ton a balls. I mean, his rockets are blowing up for God's sake.

 

What comes after the Idea Phase?

 

First, The Uncertainty Phase.

 

Characteristics: "Will this work?" and "Nah, that's stupid."

 

98% of people drop off here. Which is why successful people don't want to help. Statistically speaking, it's a waste of time because most people are going to quit. Bad investment.

 

But there's more.

 

If you make it past that, there's the "Testing It Out Phase," followed by the "Kinda Works But I'm Underwhelmed Phase," followed by the "Oh Shit It's Working Better But I Have No Idea What I'm Doing Phase," followed by the "Bleed For It" Phase, interspersed with the "Cool, NBD But I Might Be Going Bankrupt" Phase.

 

(There are other phases too. I'm still in them.)

 

Each one of these phases can last an indeterminate amount of time. And at each stage, more and more perceived “successful people” drop off because honestly...sometimes it's just not fun. It's just not.

 

So while I love and respect everybody as a person (unless I'm given a reason not to) — I do not respect you as an "entrepreneur" just because you have a good idea.

 

It's not about ideas.

 

It starts with an idea, sure. But that's not impressive, special or profound. Entrepreneurship is a perspective of looking at the world which mixes stoicism, delusion and creativity...but above all, it's catalyzed by action.

 

It's SUPPOSED to be hard. Like any journey, it'll turn you into a different person. You're going to have to become better, or you'll get wiped out.

 

Evolve or die.  

 

We do this necessary suffering of creating something from nothing to avoid the unnecessary suffering of living a life controlled by other people.

 

But there will be suffering involved. And it won't be in a Lamborghini.

 

Most people will return back to the 9-to-5...and honestly, I see the merit in that. It's predictable. You have dedicated off-time. You are only responsible for you.

 

In many ways, it's better.

 

For those of us who simply can't deal with those limitations, then just know that you'll have to pretty much risk it all if you really want to play this game — and because your tolerance for risk must be relatively high, a natural moat is created between you and everybody else who's just toying with their ideas for years.

 

I'll see you on the other side.

Originated from : Daniel DiPiazza, Rich20Something